WordPress Premium Plugin: Keyword Counter & Density Calculator

Get Key­word Counter & Den­si­ty Cal­cu­la­tor pre­mi­um ver­sion from HERE!

The Key­word Counter & Den­si­ty Cal­cu­la­tor plu­g­in cal­cu­lates how many times each key­word is used in a in a post or a page. When you write or edit a post/page, you can see a handy list of the key­words you’ve used — list­ed in order, start­ing with the words you use most com­mon­ly.

Why use Keyword Counter & Density Calculator?

If you’re writ­ing an arti­cle, one impor­tant fac­tor to keep in mind is, what are the key­words you’re using? How often do you use them? This is essen­tial for SEO (search engine opti­miza­tion) rea­sons. You want to use your key­words a bunch, but not too much.

But when you write, you’re often faced with the prob­lem: how many times did I use this key­word, or that one? Usu­al­ly, there’s a man­u­al process: control‑F (or command‑F for Mac lovers!) to find and count the num­ber of times you used it, look up the total num­ber of words, do some divi­sion — and this gets frus­trat­ing before you even start.

The solution

But look no fur­ther! The Key­word Counter & Den­si­ty Cal­cu­la­tor is here to help.

Here is how it works. Once installed and acti­vat­ed, when you write a post or a page, above the text edit­ing box, there is a new but­ton called “Count Key­words”. Click it, and a chart will come up. For all key­words, it lists their fre­quen­cy, so you can see how many times you’ve used it. It also lists their den­si­ty — both, as com­pared to the total # of words you wrote, and also as com­pared to the total num­ber of non-small words you wrote (exclud­ing words like “in”, “of”, and “but”, for exam­ple). You also get a red/yellow/green alert as to how on tar­get the den­si­ty is, so you know what you need to improve.

The Cream on the Cake: The Advanced Features

The best part, how­ev­er, are all the advanced set­tings and fea­tures — this is where the pow­er is real­ly unlocked. Our advanced fea­tures include:

* One of our two favorite fea­tures is: you can con­fig­ure key­words that are more than one word! Lets say, one of your most impor­tant key­words is the phrase, “Word­Press secu­ri­ty” — by default, that would be treat­ed as two sep­a­rate words. But you could con­fig­ure it to treat them as one phrase.

* Our oth­er favorite fea­ture is: option­al stem­ming. If you want it to treat “walk”, “walks”, “walk­ing”, “walk’s”, etc, as one word — then just turn on the stem­ming option! Note that this fea­ture pre­dicts the root based on the con­ju­ga­tion, so you might some­times get guess­es that aren’t exact­ly on mark; but it’s usu­al­ly on tar­get, and per­fect for our SEO pur­pos­es.

* You can turn on/off whether you want the count to include the small words or not.

* You can also add in words to exclude, as well.

* You can lim­it the # of key­words to review — in case it’s a huge doc­u­ment that’s using up lots of mem­o­ry!

* You can edit the list of default “small” words that are exclud­ed, in case you want to remove any, or add some more.

Say hi!

But not only is the plu­g­in great — but we’re very ded­i­cat­ed to our users. We’re friend­ly and sup­port­ive — and we love help­ing every­one out. Email us any ques­tions, or see our sup­port page at: http://www.wpsos.io/plugin-support/.

Get Key­word Counter & Den­si­ty Cal­cu­la­tor pre­mi­um ver­sion from HERE!

WordPress Premium Plugin: .htaccess Site Access Control

Get .htac­cess Site Access Con­trol pre­mi­um ver­sion from HERE!

.htac­cess Site Access Con­trol plu­g­in allows you to pass­word pro­tect your site: WP login page, admin pages, and/or the whole site. The plu­g­in adds in this func­tion­al­i­ty on top of Word­Press, using the .htac­cess pass­word pro­tec­tion func­tion­al­i­ty.

As of ver­sion 1.0, the options of the free plu­g­in include:
1. Enabling/disabling the pass­word pro­tec­tion to wp-login.php, Word­Press admin pages. Note that you’ll be asked to re-type the .htac­cess username/password you cre­at­ed before enabling any of the set­tings — to ensure that you would­n’t enable the pass­word pro­tec­tion with­out even know­ing the pass­word your­self!
2. Mod­i­fy­ing the exist­ing users: you can change any .htac­cess user’s pass­word and remove the users.
3. Adding one .htac­cess user.

With pre­mi­um plu­g­in, you can also:
1. Create/modify an unlim­it­ed num­ber of .htac­cess users;
2. Pro­tect your whole site, mak­ing it acces­si­ble to only those who have the .htac­cess user.

Get our pre­mi­um plu­g­in from HERE!

Using the pass­word pro­tec­tion will give you extra secu­ri­ty lay­er of pro­tec­tion from brute force hack­ing attacks. Addi­tion­al­ly, it’s also an easy way to pass­word pro­tect your entire site, with­out need­ing to cre­ate sep­a­rate Word­Press users for each vis­i­tor.

When you enable the pass­word pro­tec­tion, the user won’t be able to see any­thing — not even see the pro­tect­ed page — until he/she inserts the username/password. You can pass­word pro­tect the whole web­site, includ­ing the admin­is­tra­tor pages; you can pass­word pro­tect the admin­is­tra­tor pages; or you can pass­word pro­tect the Word­Press login page.

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

WordPress Plugin: Site Language Definition

Site Lan­guage Def­i­n­i­tion is a sim­ple plu­g­in for forc­ing the web brows­er to know what lan­guage your site is in.

Site Lan­guage Def­i­n­i­tion solves a com­mon prob­lem: your web­site is in your cho­sen lan­guage but for some rea­son the brows­er ‘thinks’ it’s in anoth­er lan­guage.

It is par­tic­u­lar­ly com­mon to think that your site is in a dif­fer­ent lan­guage — many Chrome users get mes­sages from Chrome along the lines of, “This site is in Indone­sian. Would you like Chrome to trans­late it?” even when the site does­n’t have a hint of Indone­sian! This has very neg­a­tive SEO ram­i­fi­ca­tions: Google pri­or­i­tizes in its search results sites that it knows are in the user’s lan­guage.

Site Lan­guage Def­i­n­i­tion plu­g­ins adds the nec­es­sary lan­guage attrib­ut­es to your web­site to force the browsers see the web­site as con­fig­ured under the Word­Press Gen­er­al Set­tings. If you need to change the lan­guage, just go to Set­tings -> Gen­er­al, and change the lan­guage of your web­site.

If you have any oth­er sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/

WordPress Plugin: Remove Feed Links

Remove Feed Links is a sim­ple plu­g­in for remov­ing feed links from the head of your web site.

Word­Press always includes links to the RSS and ATOM feeds by default — but some­times, you just don’t want them.

Maybe your site does­n’t have a feed, such as a sta­t­ic brochure site.
Maybe you don’t want peo­ple using RSS or ATOM to fol­low the site on a read­er, but instead you want them to come direct­ly to the site.
Or maybe you just want to remove every extra char­ac­ter in the code for speed rea­sons.

For us, it was all three of the above! But we could­n’t find a good solu­tion, oth­er than going in and edit­ing direct­ly the tem­plates — which we try to avoid.

The solu­tion? We built the “Remove Feed Links” plu­g­in which does pre­cise­ly what you expect: it removes the links, in the HTML the user sees, to the RSS and ATOM feeds that Word­Press includes by default.

The plu­g­in Remove Feed Links does that by remov­ing post, com­ments, and/or extra (cat­e­go­ry, tags, author) feeds from the head of your site.

The instal­la­tion and use is very straight­for­ward. You should:

1. Upload the fold­er ‘remove-feed-links‘ to the ‘/wp-con­tent/­plu­g­in­s/‘ direc­to­ry
2. Acti­vate the plu­g­in through the ‘Plu­g­ins’ menu in Word­Press

As of ver­sion 1.0, you can choose between 3 options which feed links do you want to remove. You can remove:
1. Com­ments feed links;
2. Posts feed links;
3. Extra Feed links: cat­e­go­ry, tag, search page, author page feed.

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

WordPress Plugin: Keyword Landing Page Generator

Get Key­word Land­ing Page Gen­er­a­tor pre­mi­um ver­sion from HERE!

Key­word Land­ing Page Gen­er­a­tor allows you to have one land­ing page, with dif­fer­ent ver­sions (at dif­fer­ent URLs) depend­ing on the key­word — so you can show each vis­i­tor a cus­tomized ver­sion of the land­ing page!

It’s a com­mon prob­lem of mar­keters that you’d like to show dif­fer­ent ver­sions of a land­ing page to a user accord­ing to what they are look­ing for — one for peo­ple look­ing for a “cheap” prod­uct, one for peo­ple look­ing for the prod­uct deliv­ered “fast,” and one for peo­ple look­ing for a “high qual­i­ty” ver­sion of the prod­uct, for exam­ple. Or if you want to have sep­a­rate pages for peo­ple search­ing for red, green, or blue ver­sions of your prod­uct. The pos­si­bil­i­ties are end­less!

Until now, the only solu­tion was to cre­ate hun­dreds of dif­fer­ent land­ing pages — not only is this very time-con­sum­ing but, if you want to update them, it turns into a night­mare!

The solu­tion? The Key­word Land­ing Page Gen­er­a­tor. This pre­mi­um plu­g­in lets you have one land­ing page, but actu­al­ly have three (or three-thou­sand!) unique pages on Word­Press to dri­ve traf­fic to, each one cus­tomized for that tar­get mar­ket.

Each page has a unique URL that is SEO friend­ly and very easy to mod­i­fy, indi­vid­u­al­ly or all at once. You could have Google-friend­ly URLs such as: /intro/cheap/ and /intro/fast/ and /in­tro/high-qual­i­ty/ in the above exam­ple — and an unlim­it­ed num­ber. The pages dis­played would be the same to all — except at the points in which you define, where the head­line text or image or any oth­er com­po­nent or com­po­nents (as few or as many as you like) would change accord­ing to the rules, def­i­n­i­tions, and text you’ve defined in the easy-to-use plu­g­in con­fig­u­ra­tion.

Get Key­word Land­ing Page Gen­er­a­tor from Enva­to!

WordPress Plugin: Stop Gravity Forms From Disappearing

Stop Grav­i­ty Forms From Dis­ap­pear­ing is a sim­ple plu­g­in for ensur­ing that Grav­i­ty Forms nev­er dis­ap­pear.

The plu­g­in solves the prob­lem of Grav­i­ty Forms just not dis­play­ing on your page.

It’s a com­mon issue with Grav­i­ty Forms: all is con­fig­ured, every­thing is ready, the form pub­lished… but it does­n’t appear on the page. It’s just blank.

Note that this issue is most like­ly caused in case your used theme or anoth­er plu­g­in is caus­ing a JavaScript error, and the best way to resolve this issue is to fix the JavaScript errors. (See the com­ments below to see what Grav­i­ty For­m’s sug­ges­tion is to fix the issue.)

Stop Grav­i­ty Forms From Dis­ap­pear­ing forces the form to be dis­played.

The instal­la­tion and use is very straight­for­ward. You should:

1. Upload the fold­er ‘stop-grav­i­ty-forms-from-dis­ap­pear­ing’ to the ‘/wp-con­tent/­plu­g­in­s/’ direc­to­ry
2. Acti­vate the plu­g­in through the ‘Plu­g­ins’ menu in Word­Press

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

WordPress Plugin: Square Bracket Hack Prevention

The Square Brack­et Hack Pre­ven­tion plu­g­in pre­vents a sim­ple but very com­mon exploit of Word­Press, by adding in a .htac­cess rule pre­vent­ing hack­ers from adding a “[“ to the URL.

A com­mon attempt at a WPSOS exploit is to add a “[“ to a URL, which can often break a site and expose an abil­i­ty to inject code. This plu­g­in stops it by ban­ning all attempts at adding a “[“ to the URL. It does so via adding code to the .htac­cess file.

Addi­tion­al­ly, upon the unin­stal­la­tion of the plu­g­in, the line is removed. And if the .htac­cess file is not editable, then the admin user is warned.

The instal­la­tion and use is very straight­for­ward. You should:

1. Upload the fold­er ‘square-brack­et-hack-pre­ven­tion‘ to the ‘/wp-con­tent/­plu­g­in­s/‘ direc­to­ry
2. Acti­vate the plu­g­in through the ‘Plu­g­ins’ menu in Word­Press

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

WordPress Plugin: Unblock CSS & JS for Googlebot

Unblock CSS & JS for Google­bot plu­g­in allows Google­bot to access the JavaScript and CSS files.

Google peri­od­i­cal­ly sends to web­mas­ters warn­ings that their JavaScript .js files and their CSS stylesheets are blocked — even when the web­mas­ters have nev­er explic­it­ly done so. In fact, it is esti­mat­ed that 85% of all users of Google web­mas­ter tools have received such a warn­ing.

Unblock CSS & JS for Google­bot solves this prob­lem for you — and no con­fig­u­ra­tion is need­ed. Just install and acti­vate the plu­g­in.

How does it work? It just adds in three lines to your robots.txt file to ensure the Google spi­der can get through.

You don’t want it any­more? Just unin­stall and the added lines will be removed.

The instal­la­tion and use is very straight­for­ward. You should:

1. Upload the fold­er ‘allow-google­bot‘ to the ‘/wp-con­tent/­plu­g­in­s/‘ direc­to­ry
2. Acti­vate the plu­g­in through the ‘Plu­g­ins’ menu in Word­Press

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

WordPress Plugin: Automatic Copyright Year

Auto­mat­ic Copy­right Year seeks to solve a com­mon prob­lem: keep­ing your copy­right year up-to-date.

It’s a prob­lem all of us had: on Jan­u­ary 1st every year, we need to go through every one of our web­sites and update all the foot­ers. And when we see oth­er peo­ple’s sites that, in the foot­er, say, “© 1998” then sud­den­ly it’s revealed how out-of-date the site is.

With Auto­mat­ic Copy­right Year, this prob­lem will nev­er hap­pen to you!

Instead of going through every site you have each year on the 1st of Jan­u­ary and change the year man­u­al­ly, now it will all be done seam­lessy for you. Just install the Auto­mat­ic Copy­right Year plu­g­in and voila: your sites will always have an up-to-date copy­right.

The instal­la­tion and use is very straight­for­ward. You should:

1. Upload the fold­er ‘auto­mat­ic-copy­right-year‘ to the ‘/wp-con­tent/­plu­g­in­s/‘ direc­to­ry
2. Acti­vate the plu­g­in through the ‘Plu­g­ins’ menu in Word­Press
3. Add ‘<span>2020</span>’ to a wid­get or to any­where inside the html foot­er ele­ment

As of ver­sion 1.0, there is no need to mod­i­fy any options. The plu­g­in will go through the con­tent of your wid­gets and the html foot­er tag and replace <span>2020</span> with the cur­rent year num­ber.

If you have any sug­ges­tions, please let us know! You can con­tact us via http://wpsos.io/.

Password Protecting WordPress wp-admin Folder

Pro­tect­ing wp-admin fold­er with HTTP authen­ti­ca­tion adds an addi­tion­al pro­tec­tion lay­er for your serv­er. Pass­word pro­tect­ing the admin area makes it hard­er to brute-force access (it’s also pos­si­ble to pass­word pro­tect only wp-login.php).

For hard­en­ing the wp-admin fold­er, cre­ate a .htpass­wds file for stor­ing the pass­word of the addi­tion­al authen­ti­ca­tion (for cre­at­ing the file man­u­al­ly, you can use this htpass­wds gen­er­a­tor for exam­ple).

Cre­ate a .htac­cess file to the wp-admin fold­er. Note that pass­word pro­tect­ing the whole wp-admin fold­er breaks any code that uses ajax on front-end, there­fore make sure to allow /wp-admin/ad­min-ajax.

The con­tent of the .htac­cess file:

AuthUser­File /path/to/.htpasswd
AuthType basic
Auth­Name “Restrict­ed”
require valid-user

<Files admin-ajax.php>
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
Sat­is­fy any
</Files>